Category

Announcement

R Consortium Community Grants and Sponsorships Top USD $1,000,000

By | Announcement

Fall Grant Application Cycle Starts September 2019

SAN FRANCISCO, August 28, 2019 – The R Consortium, a Linux Foundation project supporting the R Foundation and R community, today announced a major milestone of $1,000,000 in grants and sponsorships approved. This includes both grants for R projects like R-hub, R-Ladies, RC RUGS, and many more, and community event sponsorships, like financial support for useR! 2019, R Cascadia, R/Medicine, and other R events large and small worldwide. The nonprofit organization also announced that they will begin accepting Fall Grant Cycle proposals starting September 2019.

Grants are awarded in areas of software development, developing new teaching materials, documenting best practices, standardising APIs or other areas of research that “broadly help the R community.” Full details for submitting a proposal, deadlines, and a list of previously funded projects is available at: https://www.r-consortium.org/projects/call-for-proposals

“The goal of the R Consortium is to strengthen the R community by improving infrastructure and building for long term stability,” said Hadley Wickham, Infrastructure Steering Committee Chair, R Consortium. “The grants help support important projects that impact many R users through better software and stronger communities. We are so grateful for the immense work that the R community does and so happy that we can contribute back.”

Example sponsorship and grant recipients include:

  • R-hub, a centralised tool for checking R packages;
  • R-Ladies, a world-wide organization whose mission is to promote diversity in the R community;
  • RC RUGS, the R Consortium’s R user group and small conference support program;
  • SatRDays, bootstrapping a system for local R conferences;
  • Testing DBI and improving key open source database backends.

A complete list of projects that previously received grants is available at https://www.r-consortium.org/projects/awarded-projects

“In the R-hub project we created and operate a multi-platform build and check service for R packages, free to use for everyone in the R community, thanks to the support of the R Consortium,” said Gábor Csárdi, software engineer at RStudio, and author and maintainer of R-hub. “As of today R-hub supports 20 platforms on four operating systems (macOS, Windows, Linux, Solaris), and since its start it has handled 68,000 submissions, for more than 3,000 different R packages, from more than 2,000 package maintainers. It has become a key tool for R developers around the world.”

“Thanks to R Consortium for their support in helping R-Ladies grow to 167 groups in 47 countries with close to 50,000 members,” said Gabriela de Queiroz, Senior Engineering and Data Science Manager at IBM and Founder of R-Ladies. “With their support, we’re able to help people who identify as underrepresented minority achieve their programming potential through our network of R leaders, mentors, and learners.”

“RC RUGS is able to focus on supporting user groups and smaller conferences around the world, filling a real need to support grass-roots organizations that are not in large cities or other well-known locations. There are great R communities around the world in many different locations. This year we are delighted to see user groups applying from Latin America, Africa, South Asia and other underserved regions throughout the world,” said Joseph Rickert, R Consortium Director and administrator of the program. “We are trying very hard to connect R users with limited resources into the greater R Community”. 

The 2019 Fall grant cycle open September 2019. More information on submitting a proposal for a grant is available at: https://www.r-consortium.org/projects/call-for-proposals

About The R Consortium 

The R Consortium is a 501(c)6 nonprofit organization and Linux Foundation project dedicated to the support and growth of the R user community. The R Consortium provides support to the R Foundation and to the greater R Community for projects that assist R package developers, provide documentation and training, facilitate the growth of the R Community and promote the use of the R language. For more information about R Consortium, please visit: http://www.r-consortium.org.


2019 Update One: R Consortium and ISC Announce the Newest Funded Projects for the R Community

By | Announcement, Blog

We are excited to announce a wide and diverse group of new R Consortium funded projects. If you are interested in finding out more about these projects, connect with the project owners via links provided below each project. 

New Projects include:

Strengthening of R in support of spatial data infrastructures management

Project Owner: Emmanuel Blondel

The project aims to strengthen the role of R in support of Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI) management, through major enhancements of the geometa R package which offers tools for reading and writing ISO/OGC geographic metadata, including ISO 19115, 19110, and 19119 through the ISO 19139 XML format. This also extends to the Geographic Markup Language (GML – ISO 19136) used for describing geographic data. The use of geometa in combination with publication tools such as ows4R and geosapi fosters the use of R software to ease the management and publication of metadata documents and related datasets in web catalogues, and then allows to move forward with a real R implementation of spatial data management plans based on FAIR (Findable, Accessible Interoperable and Reusable) principles.

The work plan includes several activities such as working on the completeness of the ISO 19115 (ISO 19115-1 and 19115-2) data model in geometa, functions to read/write multilingual metadata documents, and an increased metadata validation capability with a validator targeting the EU INSPIRE directive. Finally, functions will be made available to convert between geometa ISO/OGC metadata objects and other known metadata objects such as NetCDF-CF and EML (Ecological Metadata Language) to foster metadata interoperability. By providing these R tools, we seek to facilitate the work of spatial data (GIS) managers, but also data scientists, whatever the thematic domain, whose daily tasks consist in handling data, describing them with metadata and publishing datasets

Learn more about the project here

Catalyzing R-hub Adoption Through R Package Developer Advocacy

Project Owner:  Maëlle Salmon,

After the continuing technical progress of R-hub over the last two years, this project aims at
catalyzing its adoption by R package developers of all levels through developer advocacy. Indeed, R-hub is currently a successful and very valuable project, but it is not documented thoroughly, which hinders its wider adoption by package developers. This project shall answer this concern by three main actions: improving R-hub documentation, making R-hub
better known in the community and making the R-hub web site more attractive to, and easier to use by, R developers and users via the ingestion of METACRAN services and the creation of a R-hub blog.

Learn more about the project here

 

Licensing R – Guidelines and Tools

Project Owner: Colin Fay

Licensing is a vital part of Open Source. It provides guidelines for interacting with a program, and for making code accessible and reusable (or not). It provides a way to make code open source, in a way one wants to share it, protecting how it will be used and reused. Licensing is also challenging and complex: there are a lot of available licenses, and the choice is influenced by how you import and interact with elements from other packages and/or programs.

With this project, we propose to explore and document the current state of open source licenses in R, and to decipher compatibility and incompatibility elements inside these licenses, to help developers chose the best suited license for their project.
Screen reader support enabled.

Learn more about the project here and here.

 

Data-Driven Discovery and Tracking of  R Consortium Activities

Project Owner: Benaiah Chibuokem Ubah

This project proposes an infrastructure that provides a data-driven approach to render the yearly activities of the R Consortium, by deploying web pages for discovering and tracking ISC Funded Projects, RUGS and Marketing activities. These pages are planned to appear like dashboards summarizing activities in interactive tables and charts, presenting several views, trends and insights to what R Consortium has achieved over time. The project hopes that presenting these achievements in a data-driven manner to the R community, the data science community and prospective R Consortium members will promote greater transparency, productivity and community inclusiveness around R Consortium activities. Screen reader support enabled.

Learn more about the project here.

 

serveRless

Project Owners: Christoph Bodner, Florian Schwendinger, Thomas Laber

R is a great language for rapid prototyping and experimentation, but putting an R model in production is still more complex and time-consuming than it needs to be. With the growing popularity of serverless computing frameworks such as AWS Lambda and Azure Functions we see a huge chance to allow R developers to more easily deploy their code into production. We want to create an R package that provides a common API for different Function-as-a-Service providers such as Azure Functions and AWS Lambda.  We will also look into integrating Docker-as-a-Service (e.g. Azure Container Services) if appropriate. Our main goal is to build a user-friendly cloud agnostic wrapper that can be extended to include additional cloud providers later on. We want to build on the work already done for deploying R functions to AWS Lambda by Philipp Schirmer and on the work already done by Neal Fultz and Gergely Daróczi on a gRPC client/server for R, which is necessary for Azure Functions.

If you like our idea and want to help us, feel free to reach out to us on Github here

 

Next-Generation Text Layout in Grid and ggplot2

Project Owner: Claus Wilke

Text is a key component of any data visualization. We need to label axes and legends, we need to annotate or highlight specific data points, and we need to provide plot titles and captions. The R graphics package ggplot2 provides numerous features to customize the labeling and annotation of plots, but ultimately it is limited by the current capabilities of the underlying graphics library it uses, grid. Grid can draw simple text strings or mathematical expressions (via plotmath) in different colors, sizes, and fonts. However, it lacks functionality for changing formatting within a string (e.g., draw a single word in italics or in a different color), and it also cannot draw text boxes, where the text is enclosed in a box with defined margins, padding, or background color. This project will support the development of a new package, gridtext, that will alleviate these text formatting limitations. The project will also support efforts to make these new capabilities available from within ggplot2.

Learn more about the project here

 

Symbolic Formulae for Linear Mixed Models

Project Owner: Emi Tanaka

Symbolic model formulae define the structural component of a statistical model in an easier and often more accessible terms for practitioners. The earlier instance of symbolic model formulae for linear models was applied in Genstat with further generalization by Wilkinson and Rogers (1973). Chambers and Hastie (1993) describe the symbolic model formulae implementation for linear models in the S language which remains much the same in the R language (Venables et al. 2018).

Linear mixed models (LMMs) are widely used across many disciplines (e.g. ecology, psychology, agriculture, finance etc) due to its flexibility to model complex, correlated structures in the data. While the symbolic formula of linear models generally have a consistent representation and evaluation rule as implemented in stats::formula, this is not the case for LMMs. The inconsistency of symbolic formulae arises mainly in the representation of random effects, with the additional need to specify the variance-covariance structure of the random effects as well as structure of the associated model matrix that governs how the random effects are mapped to (groups of) the observational units. The differences give rise to confusion of equivalent model specification in different R-packages.

The lack of consistency in symbolic formula and model representation across mixed model software motivates the need to formulate a unified symbolic model formulae for LMMs with: (1) extension of the evaluation rules described in Wilkinson and Rogers (1973); and (2) ease of comprehension of the specified model for the user. This symbolic model formulae can be a basis for creating a common API to mixed models with wrappers to popular mixed model R-packages, thereby achieving a similar feat to parsnip R-package (Kuhn 2018) which implements a tidy unified interface to many predictive modeling functions (e.g. random forest, logistic regression, survival models etc).

We would like to find out what are your experiences with fitting linear mixed model in R! Please fill out this survey to help us understand your problems.

Learn more about the project here

 

Editorial Assistance for the R Journal

Project Owner: Di Cook  

This project supports the operation of the R Journal. There are two aspects, one is to fund an editorial assistant to send reminders about reviews, and assist with typesetting and copyediting issues. The second part is to explore updating the technical operations of the journal production.

Learn more about the project here

R Consortium Welcomes Genentech as Gold Member

By | Announcement, News

SAN FRANCISCO, March 07, 2019 – The R Consortium, a Linux Foundation project supporting the R community, today welcomed Genentech as a Gold member.  Genentech is the first company in the pharmaceutical industry to join R Consortium and plans to support the community by contributing to pan-industry collaborative projects that further the adoption of R and its application to drug and biomarker discovery, clinical reporting and pharmaceutical data science.

Thousands of statisticians, analysts and scientists worldwide rely on the R language to allow them to analyze, model and visualize large, complex datasets and to create statistical software. In addition, R provides interfaces to other computing platforms, providing users with access to the best computations for understanding data. Interest in the language is growing across industries that rely on statistical computing including, journalism, finance, AI, and now healthcare.

“We are excited to join the R Consortium as a gold member,” said Alun Bedding, director of biostatistics at Genentech, and the Genentech representative for R Consortium. “We see R as the future of statistical analysis because of its flexibility and the strong active community behind it.”

Genentech’s decision to join the R Consortium highlights how the R language is particularly well suited not just to designing clinical trials, but other areas important to the pharmaceutical industry and more broadly, medical research. Some specific examples include; reproducible research, regulatory compliance and validation, safety monitoring, drug discovery, research & development, genomics, diagnostics, PK/PD/pharmacometrics, immunogenicity and more.

“We are pleased to welcome Genentech into the R Consortium family,” said Louis Bajuk, chair of the R Consortium Board of Directors and senior director of product management for streaming and advanced analytics at TIBCO Software. “We see great value in the symbiotic relationship between our organizations as R continues to expand into pharmaceutical data science.”

Genentech joins six existing R Consortium Gold and Platinum members, including: TIBCO, IBM, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Microsoft and RStudio.

About Genentech

Founded more than 40 years ago, Genentech is a leading biotechnology company that discovers, develops, manufactures and commercializes medicines to treat patients with serious and life-threatening medical conditions. The company, a member of the Roche Group, has headquarters in South San Francisco, California. For additional information about the company, please visit http://www.gene.com.

About The R Consortium

The R Consortium is a 501(c)6 nonprofit organization and Linux Foundation project dedicated to the support and growth of the R user community. The R Consortium provides support to the R Foundation and to the greater R Community for projects that assist R package developers, provide documentation and training, facilitate the growth of the R Community and promote the use of the R language. For more information about R Consortium, please visit: http://www.r-consortium.org.

Media Contact

Nancy McGrory

The Linux Foundation nmcgrory@linuxfoundation.org


ISC Call for Proposals

By | Announcement, Blog

The March 2019 ISC Call for Proposals is now open. Once again, we are looking for ambitious projects that will contribute to the infrastructure of the R ecosystem and benefit large sections of the R community.  

Our goal in calling for proposals is to stimulate creativity and help turn good ideas into tangible benefits for the R Community. What can you do to improve the R ecosystem and how can the R Consortium help you do it?

We encourage you to “Think Big” but structure your proposal with intermediate milestones. The ISC is most likely to fund proposals that ask for modest initial grants. We tend to be conservative with initial grants, preferring projects structured in way that significant early milestones can be achieved with a modest amount of financial support.

As with any proposed project, the more detailed and credible the project plan and the better the track record of the project team, the higher the likelihood of receiving funding. Please be sure that your proposal includes the following:

  • Measurable objectives
  • Intermediate milestones
  • A list of all team members who will contributing work
  • Detailed accounting of how the grant money will be spent

You may find that reviewing some previously funded projects will help stimulate your thinking. Notice that not all projects require software development. The Guide to using Census Data and the Missing Data Task View are work products from recent ISC funded projects that focused on documentation.  

If you are really thinking big, consider proposing an ambitious project such as the R Validation Hub, or the R / Pharma and R / Medicine conferences that are funded and organized as ISC working groups.

Please note that proposals to sponsor conferences, workshops or meetups should be sent directly to the R Consortium’s R User Group and Small Conference Support Program, or the R Consortium Marketing Committee.

To submit a proposal for ISC funding, read the Call for Proposals page and submit a self-contained pdf using the online form. You should receive confirmation within 24 hours.

The deadline for submitting a proposal is midnight PST, April 1, 2019.

RC RUGS 2019 Is Up and Running

By | Announcement, Blog, Uncategorized

The R Consortium’s 2019 R User Group and Small Conference Support program which provides cash grants to R focused user groups, and small R-themed conferences is now accepting applications for financial support.

R User Groups

Grants to R user groups are awarded in three categories that depend on the number of users who typically attend meetings, and the frequency with which the group meets.

Array Level: Large, established R user groups that held at least three meetings in the six month period prior to applying that attracted more than 100 attendees may be eligible for $1,000 grants.

Matrix Level: R user groups that held at least three meetings in the six month period prior to applying that attracted at least 50 attendees may be eligible for $500 grants.

Vector Level: Other groups, even very small ones just getting started, may be eligible for $150  grants.

In addition to the cash grants, R user groups accepted into the program are eligible to participate in the R Consortium’s meetup.com Pro program. Under this program, the R Consortium will pay a user group’s meetup.com dues for twelve months.

Small Conferences

Small conferences, typically those that expect to attract less than 200 people may apply for cash grants up to $1,000. To qualify, a conference must be either entirely devoted to the R language or applications using R, or have a significant amount of R content. To apply, conferences should have a public-facing web page with a code of conduct, information about the technical program and sponsorship information. Conferences will be evaluated, and grants awarded on a case-by-case basis.

Details for RUGS, meetup.com Pro and Small Conference programs may be found here on the R Consortium website. To apply for support, please use the online form.

 

R-users & Community: give us your feedback on a R Certification to teach & verify skilled R Professionals

By | Announcement, Blog

In the past few years, we have seen an increase in the demand for R – both from employers looking for skilled R-users and professionals looking to further improve their skills. Due to this supply and demand gap, there have been various teaching channels created in an attempt to extend knowledge of the language. Even with the abundance of R teaching material, we still face a dearth of qualified, skilled R users. The inability to differentiate self-taught data scientists from qualified personnel creates confusion for employers and difficulties for quality professionals to separate themselves from the rest.

R Consortium started a working group that has identified an absence of a system to certify qualified R professionals as a cause for this problem. As a response to this, the group is working to create a certification for R that will allow professionals and students to acquire fundamental skills and knowledge of the language. Creation of this certification also aims to help recruiters identify and assess the skills of potential recruits. This group will be driven by the needs of the current R professionals and data science recruiters. More information about this initiative can be found here.

In order for this working group to create a valuable certification, we encourage community feedback in this initiative. Your feedback will help the working group to evolve this certification to best serve the needs of the R community. Please respond to this survey to help in the creation of this certification.

Fall 2018: ISC Call for Proposals

By | Announcement, Blog

by Joseph Rickert

The second and final ISC Call for Proposals for 2018 is now open. We are looking for ambitious projects that will contribute to the infrastructure of the R ecosystem and benefit large sections of the R community. We are deliberately being a little vague here, but having awarded more than $650,000 in grants so far, we can show a substantial number of funded projects that provide examples.

If you are going to submit a proposal, “Think Big” but structure your proposal with intermediate milestones. The ISC is not likely to fund proposals that ask for large initial cash grants. We tend to be conservative with initial grants, preferring projects structured in such a way that significant initial milestones can be achieved with modest amounts of cash.

As with any proposed project, the more detailed and credible the project plan, and the better the track record of the project team, the higher the likelihood of receiving funding. Please be sure that your proposal includes measurable objectives, intermediate milestones, a list of all team members who will contributing work and a detailed accounting of how the grant money will be spent.

Also, if you think you are onto something but could use some help in finalizing scope of a project, or you think implementing your idea would require achieving some level of consensus within the R Community, you might consider asking the ISC to help you establish a working group.

If you don’t think you have an idea that is fundable but want to get involved, you might want to explore getting involved with existing projects or put some thought into one of the perennial issues associated with finding one’s way through the R ecosystem. For example, could you build a package discovery system or recommender engine that spans CRAN, Bioconductor and GitHub, or implement and curate a calendar that automatically tracks R related events worldwide?

Our goal in calling for proposals is to stimulate creativity and help turn good ideas into tangible benefits for the R Community. What can you do to improve the R ecosystem and how can the R Consortium help you do it?

Note that proposals to sponsor conferences, workshops or meetups should be sent directly to the R Consortium’s R User Group and Small Conference Support Program. These are not funded as ISC proposals. Note that the deadline for applying for support under the 2018 program is coming up quickly. Requests for support under the 2018 program must be received by midnight, September 30, 2018. The 2019 program will launch sometime in January.

To submit a proposal for ISC funding, read the Call for Proposals page and submit a self-contained pdf using the online form. You should receive confirmation within 24 hours.

The deadline for submitting a proposal is midnight PST, Sunday October 31, 2018.

On conduct and diversity in the R Community

By | Announcement, Blog, Events, News, R Consortium Project

An explicit goal of the R Consortium is to help create a welcoming space for everyone, no matter their race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, socio-economic status, nationality, citizenship, religion, sexual orientation, ability, or age. Diversity and inclusion are essential to foster true collaboration, move ideas forward, and create long-term sustainable community.

R Consortium recently sponsored R/Finance 2018, where it was found that there were insufficient diversity and inclusion practices, including the absence of a prominently displayed Code of Conduct. This illuminated shortcomings with our existing processes for sponsoring conferences. We are troubled and disappointed to have sponsored a conference that does not reflect our core beliefs in diversity and inclusion.

The Infrastructure Steering Committee (ISC) has approved the creation of a new working group to address diversity and inclusion issues in the R community. The R Community Diversity and Inclusion Working Group (RCDI-WG), which will include members from R Community groups that promote diversity, such as R-Ladies and FORWARDS, event organizers, and key industry members, will focus on three areas:

  • Work with conferences organizers to ensure diversity is addressed as a priority in both their program committees and speaker lineups.
  • Establish recommended Code of Conduct and Diversity Guidelines for R Community events, which will be adopted by the R Consortium and required for any event that the R Consortium participates in.
  • Have an ongoing conversation on opportunities to drive diversity and inclusion across the R Community.

This group is open to any member of the R community, and you can join by signing up for the mailing list. The group plans to have a kickoff meeting soon to work on the Code of Conduct and Diversity Guidelines, with the goal to have them established later in summer 2018. Look for updates on progress on the R Consortium blog.

Announcing the R Consortium ISC Funded Project grant recipients for Spring 2018

By | Announcement, Blog, News

The R Consortium supports the R Community through investments in sustainable infrastructure, community programs and collaborative projects. Through the The Funded Project Program, now in it’s fourth year, the R Consortium has invested more that $650,000 USD in over 30 projects that impact the over 2 million R users worldwide.

We are pleased to announce the Spring 2018 grant recipients. We will provide updates on these projects throughout the year. Congratulations to all grant recipients, and look forward to our session at useR!2018 this July where many of our funded projects will showcase their work and tips for leveraging the grant program for driving open collaboration.

Maintaining DBI

Grantee: Kirill Müller

DBI, R’s database interface, is a set of methods declared in the DBI R package. Communication with the database is implemented by DBI backends, packages that import DBI and implement its methods. A common interface is helpful for both users and backend implementers.

The Maintaining DBI Project which follows up on two previous projects supported by the R Consortium will provide ongoing maintenance and support for DBI, the DBItest test suite, and the three backends to open-source databases (RSQLite, RMariaDB and RPostgres).

Ongoing infrastructural development for R on Windows and MacOS

Grantee: Jeroen Ooms

The majority of R users rely on precompiled installers and binary packages for Windows and MacOS that are made available through CRAN. This project seeks to improve and maintain tools for providing such binaries. On Windows we will upgrade the Rtools compiler toolchain, and provide up-to-date Windows builds for the many external C/C++ libraries used by CRAN packages. For MacOS we will expand the R-Hub homebrew-cran with formulas that are needed by CRAN packages but not available from upstream homebrew-core. Eventually, we want to lay the foundation for a reproducible build system that is low maintenance, automated as much as possible, and which could be used by CRAN and other R package repositories.

Developing Tools and Templates for Teaching Materials

Grantee: François Michonneau

The first-class implementation of literate programming in R is one of the reasons for its success. While the seamless integration of code and text made possible by Sweave , knitr, and R Markdown was designed for writing reproducible reports and documentation, it has also enabled the creation of teaching materials that combine text, code examples, exercises and solutions. However, while people creating lessons in R Markdown are familiar with R, they often do not have a background in education or UX design. Therefore, they must not only assemble curriculum, but also find a way to present the content effectively and accessibly to both learners and instructors. As the model of open source development is being adapted to the creation of open educational resources, the difficulty to share materials due to a lack of consistency in their construction hinders the collaborative development of these resources.

This project will develop an R package that will facilitate the development of consistent teaching resources. It will encourage the use of tools and lesson structure that support and improve learning. By providing the technical framework for developing quality teaching materials, we seek to encourage collaborative lesson development by letting authors focus on the content rather than the formatting, while providing a more consistent experience for the learners.

PSI application for collaboration to create online R package validation repository

Grantee: Lyn Taylor (on behalf of PSI AIMS SIG)

The documentation available for R packages currently widely varies. The Statisticians in the Pharmaceutical Industry (PSI) Application and Implementation of Methodologies in Statistics (AIMS) Special Interest Group (SIG) will collaborate with the R-Consortium and representatives from pharmaceutical companies on the setting up of an online repository /web portal, where validation which is of regulatory standard for R packages can be submitted and stored for free use. Companies (or individual R users) would still be liable to make their own assessment on whether the validation is suitable for their own use, however the online repository would serve as a portal for sharing existing regulatory standard validation documentation.

A unified platform for missing values methods and workflows

Grantees: Julie Josse and Nicholas Tierney

The objective is to create a reference platform on the theme of missing data management and to federate contributors. This platform will be the occasion to list the existing packages, the available literature as well as the tutorials that allow to analyze data with missing data. New work on the subject can be easily integrated and we will create examples of analysis workflows with missing data. Anyone who would like to contribute to this exciting project can contact us.

histoRicalg — Preserving and Transfering Algorithmic Knowledge

Grantee: John C Nash

Many of the algorithms making up the numerical building-blocks of R were developed several decades ago, particularly in Fortran. Some were translated into C for use by R. Only a modest proportion of R users today are fluent in these languages, and many original authors are no longer active. Yet some of these codes may have bugs or need adjustment for new system capabilities. The histoRicalg project aims to document and test such codes that are still  part of R, possibly creating all-R reference codes, hopefully by teaming older and younger workers so knowledge can be shared for the future. Our initial task is to establish a Working Group on Algorithms Used in R and add material to a website/wiki.

Interested workers are invited to contact John Nash.

Proposal to Create an R Consortium Working Group Focused on US Census Data

Grantee: Ari Lamstein

The Proposal to Create an R Consortium Working Group Focused on US Census Data aims to make life easier for R programmers who work with data from the US Census Bureau. It will create a working group where R users working with census data can cooperate under the guidance of the Census Bureau. Additionally, it will publish a guide to working with Census data in R that aims to help R programmers a) select packages that meet their needs and b) navigate the various data sets that the Census Bureau publishes.

 

Wanted: Your input on the next generation of R-Hub

By | Announcement, Blog, R Consortium Project

R-Hub, which was originally conceived as a useful tool for R package developers to build and test R packages on a variety of platforms, was the first project funded by the R Consortium. The initial version was released in June 2016. Now that the capabilities of R-Hub have progressed well beyond the proof of concept stage, the R Consortium is looking for ideas from the R community on how we can make it and even more useful for R users.

We would like to know how you think we could improve existing functionality and what new features you would like to see. So far, we have come up with the following list of future goals for R-Hub. We welcome comments and suggestions:

  • Enable organizations to deploy repositories and build infrastructure locally for use in controlled corporate environments.
  • Provide a system to manage source code, builds, and binary packages in a repository that offers confidence and trust to R users.
  • Enable end-users to use packages with confidence by providing tools to assess code pedigree, license, quality, security, and package maintenance for individual packages.
  • Encourage and enable package developers to provide metadata for their packages to help end users discover packages.
  • Provide package authors and maintainers a broad testing matrix that works on multiple architectures, operating systems, and R runtime engines.
  • Provide package developers with feedback required to assess and ensure broad compatibility for their packages.

We would very much appreciate comments on this vision for future development along with your assessment of the current system, including your answers to such questions as:

  • What value does R Hub provide you today?
  • What does R Hub not do well?
  • What other aspects of package development should R Hub add?
  • How could R Hub best serve the corporate package development, deployment, and management process?
  • Is there anything that CRAN isn’t providing that you would like to have?

Please send your comments to the following email address:  isc@r-consortium.com

Note that you may try R-Hub here.